Monthly Archives: April 2015

CME Outcomes Statistician, first grade

I was very excited to have my CMEPalooza session (Secrets of CME Outcome Assessment) officially sanctioned by the League of Assessors (LoA).  Accordingly, participants who passed the associated examination were awarded “CME Outcome Statistician, first grade” certifications.  It’s a grueling test, but three candidates made it through and received their certifications today (names withheld due to exclusivity).

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More good news…I petitioned the LoA to extend the qualifying exam for another six weeks (expiring May 29, 2015) and was officially approved!  So you can still view the CMEPalooza session (here) and then take the qualifying exam (sorry, exam is now closed). Good luck!

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Filed under CME, CMEpalooza, League of Assessors, Outcomes

CMEPalooza

On Tuesday, Chicago will decide on either Rahm on Chuy.  But Wednesday, it’s all about CMEPalooza.  Thank you to our industry’s “Jane’s Addiction” for organizing the third installment of this CME free-for-all.  I’ll be presenting on CME outcomes assessment (11 AM eastern). My session is designed for those that fall into the following categories:

  • Regularly use surveys to measure learning and competence change
  • No formal process for reviewing survey questions
  • Unsure of how to utilize statistical tests

Oh, but there’s more…this session has been accredited by the apocryphal League of CME Assessors (sorry, can’t provide a link due to exclusivity).  If, after completing the session, you wish to be considered for eligibility as “CME Outome Statistician, first grade”, click here (sorry, this test is now closed) to take their test. There’s even a certificate if you pass. Good luck!

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Filed under CMEpalooza

Writing questions good

Although I’ve complained a fair bit about validity and reliability issues in CME assessment, I haven’t offered much on this blog to actually address these concerns. Well, the thought of thousands (and thousands and…) of dear and devoted readers facing each new day with the same, tired CME assessment questions has become too much to bear. That, and I was recently required to do a presentation on guidelines and common flaws in the creation of multiple-choice questions…so I thought I’d share it here.

I’d love to claim these pearls are all mine, but they’re just borrowed.  Nevertheless, this slide deck may serve as a handy single-resource when constructing your next assessment (and it contains some cool facts about shark attacks).

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Filed under Best practices, CME, MCQs, multiple-choice questions, Reliability, Summative assessment, Survey, survey design, Validity