Monthly Archives: March 2014

Statistical analysis in CME

Statistics can help answer important questions about your CME.  For example, was there an educational effect and, if so, how big was it?  The first question is typically answered with a P value and the second with an effect size.

If this were 10 years ago, you’d either be purchasing some expensive statistical software or hiring a consultant to answer these questions.  Today (thank you Internet), it’s simple and basically free.

A step-by-step approach can be found here.

 

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Filed under CME, CMEpalooza, Cohen's d, Effect size, P value, Statistical tests of significance, Statistics

Data analysis in Excel

Oh, was I excited to find VassarStats.  I haven’t yet encountered a CME outcome analysis that it can’t handle – and it’s free.  Yes, having to cut & paste data between Excel and VassarStats is a bit cumbersome (and subject to error), but I felt it a small price to pay.  And then I found the “data analysis toolpack” in Excel.  Well, actually, I found Jacob Coverstone’s CME/CPD blog, which unlocks this little secret here.  We’ve been sitting on the tools all along.  Thanks, Jacob, for pointing this out.

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Filed under Microsoft Excel, Statistics

CMEpalooza

CMEPalooza will be on Thursday March 20 and Friday March 21.  Like the annual professional meeting for CME (Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions), CMEpalooza is a collection of “best practice” talks.  Unlike the Alliance, the entire event will be online, archived and free.  A big thank you to Derek Warnick (aka “the CME Guy“) for putting this all together.

Based on the agenda (of 21 presentations), there are many promising talks ranging from audience recruitment, adult learning theory, linking educational objectives with outcomes, qualitative analysis, and measuring patient outcomes (I’ll be representing Imedex with a presentation on statistical analysis in CME outcomes).  Regardless of your scope of work, I suspect there will be at least one presentation in the agenda of interest.

 If you can’t participate live, no worries, everything will be archived, so view at your convenience – but make sure to check it out.

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Filed under ACCME, Alliance Conference, Alliance for CME, Best practices, CME, CMEpalooza